February 5, 2023

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Thousands of records were broken during the historic warm winter in Europe

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Heading into 2022 through 2023, an exceptionally strong wintertime heat dome spread over most of Europe, bringing an unprecedentedly warm January. With temperatures 18 to 36 degrees Fahrenheit (10 to 20 degrees Celsius) above normal from France to western Russia, thousands of records were broken between Saturday and Monday — many by large margins.

The extreme heat wave followed a record warm year in many parts of Europe and provided another example of how human-caused climate change is increasing the frequency and intensity of such unusual weather events.

On New Year’s Day, at least seven countries experienced their warmest January on record as temperatures rose to spring levels: Latvia hit 52 degrees (11.1 degrees Celsius); Denmark 54.7° (12.6°C); Lithuania, 58.3° (14.6°C); Belarus, 61.5° (16.4°C); The Netherlands, 62.4° (16.9°C); Poland, 66.2° (19.0°C); and the Czech Republic, 67.3 degrees (19.6 degrees Celsius).

Those who keep track of weather records around the world have described this warm wave as historic and unbelievable for its scope and scale.

Maximiliano Herrera, a climate scientist who tracks global weather extremes, called the event “absolutely insane” and “absolutely insane” in text messages to the D.C. weather gang. He wrote that some of the higher temperatures observed at night were uncommon in midsummer.

“It is the most extreme event ever recorded in European climatology,” Herrera wrote. “Nothing comes close to this.”

Guillaume Sechet, a broadcast meteorologist in France, agrees: Twitter That Sunday was one of the most amazing days in the history of climate in Europe.

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“It is difficult to understand the intensity and extent of the warmth in Europe at the moment,” chirp Scott Duncan, London meteorologist.

Here are some of the most impressive records set in Europe on New Year’s Day:

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While the extreme temperatures occurred on New Year’s Day, exceptionally mild weather set in on New Year’s Eve.

Dozens of daily and monthly records fell on Saturday, surpassing marks set just a year ago in many cases.

Weather service in the Czech Republic chirp The country recorded the warmest New Year’s Eve ever. Prague with 247 years of measurementsset a new monthly maximum of 63.9 °C (17.7 °C).

Here are some of the most important temperature records set on Saturday:

  • France saw impressive record values ​​such as 76.6° (24.8°C) in Verdun. the the country as a whole Experienced the warmest New Year’s Eve.
  • Six of the nine federal states In the mountainous regions of Austria, December 31st witnessed the warmest day on record. The temperatures were as warm as 64.9 degrees (18.3 degrees Celsius) in Asbach.
  • Luxembourg set a record high for December with 64.0 degrees (17.8 degrees Celsius). in Wormeldange. Belgium hit a record high in December of 63.5 degrees (17.5 degrees Celsius) in Diebenbeck.
  • Bad Neuenahr-Ahrweiler overtook Germany The highest minimum for the month of December It only dropped to 59.5 degrees (15.3 degrees Celsius).

Monday marks the third day of widespread and unheard of high temperatures in the middle of winter. Many monthly and daily records have been set in the eastern half of Europe, particularly in Germany, Hungary, Romania and Russia.

By Tuesday, places with above-average temperatures are likely to shift toward Ukraine. After that, it should ease off some warmth.

This exceptional winter warmth comes on the heels of the warmest 2022 in many parts of Europe, including within United kingdomAnd the Germany And the Switzerland.

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High temperatures visited Europe in waves throughout the year and were intensified by historically severe summer droughts. The mix helped push the UK to 104 degrees (40C) for For the first time in the registry in July.

The science of heat domes and how droughts and climate change are making them worse

Although the warmth is slowly fading in Europe Arctic air creeps in from the northeastHigher-than-normal temperatures are expected across much of the mainland region until at least January 10. After that, the outlook is less clear, but a cooler pattern may emerge by the middle of the month.