August 18, 2022

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The Barshawi meteor shower begins: when and where to see it

The Barshawi meteor shower begins: when and where to see it

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The Perseids—one of the biggest meteor showers of the year—are back this summer.

According to NASA, the evenings of August 12 and August 13 will be a great opportunity for sky watchers to catch the show.

However, the full moon could negatively affect the show this year.

The agency notices that Chivalry is generally active From July 14 to August 24.

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Inner Mongolia, China – August 17, 2021 – The Perseid meteor is seen over the Tengger Desert in northern China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, August 17, 2020.
(must read photo by Costfoto/Future Publishing via Getty Images)

According to FOX Weather, storms can also be a negative factor, and the channel said July 28 — when there will be a new moon — would also be an excellent time for stargazing.

The channel noted that depending on where the viewer is located in the northern hemisphere, there could be up to 40 meteors seen per hour during the peak showers.

Perseids occur when they cross the Earth through a debris stream Comet 109P / Swift-Tuttle and its meteors Most of them are the size of a pea – they create bright “falling stars” as they burn up in the planet’s atmosphere.

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The meteors appear to radiate from the constellation of Perseus, or “the rays of the shower,” but they can be seen crossing the sky anywhere at 37 miles per second.

The The shower is also known as its fireballswhich can last longer than the average meteor streak.

A Perseid meteor is seen over the Zhongtiao mountain range in Yuncheng City, North China's Shanxi Province, August 14, 2021.

A Perseid meteor is seen over the Zhongtiao mountain range in Yuncheng City, North China’s Shanxi Province, August 14, 2021.
(must read photo by Costfoto/Future Publishing via Getty Images)

Swift-Tuttle orbits between the Sun and beyond Pluto’s orbit once every 133 years.

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Every year, the Earth passes close to the path of a comet.

NASA says there is no chance The planet will soon collide with a comet.